2011 Appropriations Requests

Many constituents are interested in federal appropriations and how they work. The responsible application of appropiated funds, federal resources designated for local projects of high public purpose, can have widespread benefits for our state, our communities, and our nation.

The federal appropriations process is lengthy and complicated, involving 12 separate bills. Once approriation requests are reviewed and funded in the legislative process, they are posted on this website and announced by my office to the news media.

For your information, below is a categorized list of the Eighth District appropriations requested by my office and included in the FY 2011 House appropriations legislation.

 

Agriculture

$685,000

Fayetteville State University
1200 Murchison Road
Fayetteville, NC 28301

This will provide business training in non-traditional settings that are convenient for working farmers, employment of undergraduate and MBA students, under the supervision of the Center for Entrepreneurship and faculty advisors, to provide training and supportive services to small-scale farmers while gaining real-world business experience, and through partnership with the BRAC Regional Task Force, direct access by program participants to new direct and institutional markets being developed in the region.

$170,000

Rural Development Leadership Network.
P.O Box 98, Prince St. Station
New York, NY 10012

This project will provide 2 fellowships for emerging leaders in rural community development in the 8th District of North Carolina.  The fellowships will include tuition, stipends, travel, educational materials, capacity building, and seed money for community-based field projects and funds for resource people and the development of educational materials.  The project will also will strengthen local leadership, create capacity, attract funding, and support constructive development activities.  A national network will support local leaders with capacity building activities and resources. 

$334,440

North Carolina Department of Agriculture
2 W. Edenton St
Raleigh, NC 27601

The first goal of this project would be to enhance the AHP to exchange information (import data) with Global Vet Link and assure there are adequate fields to store information from the USDA Veterinary Services Process Streamlining (VSPS) USDA. A second step to this project would be to tie the intrastate health certificate information to individual premises in the AHP.
The AHP is a module of the MHTD (www.ncmhtd.com) and is currently being upgraded. Thus, fiscal year 2011 would be a good time to implement changes in traceability and data exchange. The Premises Management module is scheduled to go into production March 2010. Adding a data exchange where intrastate animal movement would be a logical step. With assistance, the Department can continue to protect the food that is consumed in North Carolina and across the nation.
 

$2 million

ARS Research Service
North Carolina Research Campus
150 Research Campus Drive
Kannapolis, NC 28081

This funding would continue work which started with  initial funding provided through USDA in Fiscal Year 2010, ARS scientists in collaboration with researchers from UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State University will soon start conducting research at the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis, NC using state of the art genomic, proteomic and metabolomic biotechnology methods to: (1) design healthier agricultural products; (2) improve health and nutrition, and (3) better understand the impact that diet and exercise have on preventing cancer, type II diabetes and other obesity-related diseases. Research will also be conducted to evaluate how nutrition affects human health on an individual basis and to develop customized solutions that target individual responses to diet and nutrition. Fiscal Year 2011 funding will enable ARS to continue and expand the aforementioned research activities - benefiting taxpayers by advancing public health and creating jobs.

Subcommittee:  Agriculture
Agency:  CSREES
Account:  Extension activities
Program Title: Smith-Lever Act
FY10 Amount: $290 million
President’s Budget Request: $290 million
Request Amount: $350 million

Subcommittee:  Agriculture
Agency:  Rural Utility Service
Account:  Rural Water and waste water disposal programs
Program Title: Circuit Riders
FY10 Amount: $15.0 million
President’s Budget Request: $14 million
Request Amount: $15.49 million


Subcommittee: 
Agriculture
Agency:  Farm Service Agency
Account: Grassroots Source Water Protection
Program Title: Grassroots Source Water Protection Program
FY10 Amount: $5 million
President’s Budget Request: $0
Request Amount: $6.4 million


Subcommittee:
  Agriculture
Agency:  Rural Utility Service
Account:  Rural Water and waste water disposal programs
Program Title: Rural Water Infrastructure Grants and Loans
FY10 Amount: $568.7 million
President’s Budget Request: $534.4 million
Request Amount: $650 million

Subcommittee:  Agriculture
Agency:  Rural Utilities Service
Account:  Rural electrification loan programs
Program Title: Electric Loan Program
FY10 Amount: $6.5 billion
President’s Budget Request: $4 billion
Request Amount: $6.5 billion

Defense

$1,030,000

Laurinburg-Maxton Airport
16701 Airport Rd.
Maxton, NC  28364

This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the runway improvements will preserve the heavy-use capacity at the Laurinburg-Maxton Airport.  Additionally, the improvements will allow the United States military continued use of this important facility for operations out of Fort Bragg and the installation’s various training mission.  It will also permit the airport to serve as an engine for economic development in a portion of North Carolina in desperate need of private-sector investment and jobs. 

$953,000

Appalachian State University
ASU Box 32002
Boone, NC  28608

The research focus will be the development of human performance strategies and novel nutritional supplements that will allow warfighters to optimize training gains with reduced risk of injury, illness, muscle soreness, and the overtraining syndrome. The initial focus will be with the special operation forces at USASOC (Fort Bragg) and MARSOC (Camp Lejeune), with whom relationships have already been established.
In order to meet these goals, funding is needed to purchase equipment to carry out the research. The equipment will upgrade the lab facility to test all facets of Human Performance at its highest level. This includes the DXA machine for body composition and bone density measurements, Isokinetic and isotonic resistance training equipment, treadmills and metabolic equipment for cardio respiratory testing. We will work with the military staff and operators to train them on advanced testing techniques that are not possible using their existing equipment.
Primary Goals of the NCRC Center of Excellence in Human Performance:
Our uniqueness has been and will continue to be a research emphasis on the influences of nutrition and exercise (varying workloads, from moderate to severe) on immune function, illness, inflammation, and oxidative stress.  We will continue to investigate unique nutritional countermeasures to exercise-induced immune dysfunction and illness.  The primary goal will be to develop an advanced nutritional supplement that will support peak soldier performance and help warfighters train at a high level with reduced illness, inflammation, oxidative stress, and muscle soreness.  We have relationships with several companies that will utilize the research information and quickly produce novel flavonoid-based soft chew and beverage supplements for military use.  The superb laboratories at the NCRC will allow us to measure bioactive effects and understand underlying mechanisms. 
At the same time, a second goal will be to develop training strategies that allow warfighters optimize results with reduced risks of injury, illness, and soreness.  For example, we have previously shown that a daily 45-minute walk reduces illness rates compared to sedentary controls.  As exercise intensity and duration increase, a threshold is reached where the exercise becomes a stressor with resulting immune dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress.  We need to better identify this threshold at the individual level, with the development of novel biomarkers (and simple field measures) that predict overtraining.  Also, we have some data that the use of 2-3 minute rest intervals interspersed during training sessions reduces the risk of immune dysfunction, and that resistance training imposes less physiological stress to immunity than high intensity running.  The ASU-NCRC Human Performance Laboratory is well positioned to make the measurements and conduct the experiments that will result in improved training strategies and an understanding of when the warfighter reaches the overtraining zone.

$4,600,000

Partnership for Defense Innovation
455 Ramsey Street
Fayetteville, NC  28301

Cellular communications enables the tactical user to immediately share critical imagery, intelligence or information developed during tactical operations among individuals and small units, and to immediately transmit that information from ground teams to the appropriate higher operational commands.  Our soldiers must have robust communications. 
The US Army Special Operations Command and Joint Special Operations Command at Ft. Bragg are the most technologically skilled units in the military.  Technologies must be developed rapidly to meet their immediate needs. The Partnership for Defense Innovation’s Wi-Fi Laboratory Testing and Assessment Center creates collaborations between the military, entrepreneurs and innovators that drive security and defense technology development.
Special Operations Forces of the future will need to be increasingly deployed in support of worldwide operations and are required to maintain communications with higher headquarters and other teams operating within the same area.  Current tactical radio systems used by Special Operations are often large, complex and do not provide enough bandwidth to process large amounts of data, imagery and video. The Special Operations soldier needs small rugged handheld devices which facilitate immediate instant messaging/text messaging, exchange of data, voice communications, and imagery on demand. This critical information must be available to higher headquarters and each team member simultaneously.  Currently there are no systems available to the dismounted tactical user that provides the robustness and flexibility to meet these requirements.  Cellular communications can provide this capability. 

$1,000,000

North Carolina National Guard
4105 Reedy Creek Rd
Raleigh, NC  27607

This project will provide a direct benefit to the Nation’s youth.  North Carolina averages 21,000 high school dropouts annually.  As part of the national Youth ChalleNGe Program, North Carolina’s Tarheel Challenge Academy (TCA) helps at-risk youths develop the life-skills necessary to become productive citizens.  TCA, with one campus in Salemburg, NC, provides services to selected North Carolina high-school dropouts between the ages of 16 and 18, graduating approximately 250 cadets each year.  About 70% earn their General Education Development diploma while attending TCA.   To help address the state’s high school dropout problem, the NCNG wishes to increase the annual number of Tarheel ChalleNGe graduates by opening a second site in the central part of the state, at Badin, NC.  
This request will provide directed design funds to develop a second site in Badin.  At full capacity, Badin will graduate 500 cadets annually.  This second site will provide a more western NC location to ensure at-risk youth throughout the state have the opportunity to become productive, employed, law abiding citizens of North Carolina.

$355,000

National Organization on Disability
5 East 86th Street
New York, NY  10028

This program is a collaborative effort between the National Organization of Disability and the Army Wounded Warrior (AW2) program.  It accelerates the return to self-sufficiency for severely wounded veterans through proactive career counseling and employment services for certain transitioning veterans who need specialized support. Because many of these veterans have families (70% are married and 65% have children <18) and over 75% have disability ratings exceeding 50%, they face significant obstacles planning and pursuing civilian careers. This demonstration is already achieving impressive results in helping veterans move forward with careers at three existing sites (over 63% have enter education, training, or work). Continuation of the program in North Carolina, including focused mental health referral support, reduces the risk that veterans and their families will fail to achieve self-sufficiency and will reduce their reliance on federal, state, and local agencies that provide a range of social services. Moreover, this program keeps faith with those who have borne the burden of defending the Nation and is important to future recruiting efforts for the All-Volunteer Force.

$1,600,000

North Carolina National Guard
4105 Reedy Creek Rd
Raleigh, NC  27607

Family Assistance Centers (FAC) provide essential support and services to families of the North Carolina National Guard (NCNG) and of all the other Armed Services.  NCNG families are not geographically centered near active military installations which provide services to their members.  NCNG families are spread throughout the state and in most cases cannot get to installations on a routine basis or without some hardship.  Maintaining the four federally funded FACs across the state allows the NCNG to provide consistent and continuous vital support and services to the families of the NCNG and the Armed Services.  Continued funding of this program will significantly reduce the impact on families, directly contributing to sustaining a strong NCNG.  Support of families has a direct strategic impact upon the National Guard as families play a major role in a service member’s decision on whether to remain in the National Guard.  Trained, experienced service members, who remain in the military, save recruiting and training costs and enhance unit readiness.

$2,000,000

North Carolina State University
Campus Box 7214
Raleigh, NC  27695

This project will develop Transcutaneous Osseointegrated Prosthetics for soldiers with combat injuries.  Soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with combat injuries resulting in amputation of the limbs are destined to use external prosthetic devices. Lower limb prosthetics are known to cause problems and discomfort preventing veterans from living active, fulfilling lives. Transcutaneous Osseointegrated Prosthetics could solve many of these problems offering these young men and women more normal, rewarding lives. This proposal seeks to develop the technology necessary to develop this new generation of prostheses, test its effectiveness through animal and human surgeries, and dramatically improve the lives of our combat veterans…
NC State University possesses the first Electron Beam Melting (EBM) machine to make 3D structures from powder titanium and is the only university in the country to house two machines.  This EBM machine and the NC State University experience with it form the basis for the work done over the past five years to develop implantable limb prosthetics.  External prosthetics have been used for decades to return amputees to ambulation; however the problems and issues are many. Lower extremity prosthetics cause the most problems in the form of skin irritations, skin ablations, soft tissue reshaping, and bone resorption. This can be painful and limits mobility. Normally the loads are transferred through the bones keeping the bone healthy and dense. External prosthetics transfer the loads from the body to the ground through the soft tissue causing the remaining bone in the leg to deteriorate, which can lead to further fractures and soft tissue remodeling.
Due to this problem the sockets for the external prosthetics need to be refit on a continuing basis to provide a stable connection between the stump and prosthetic device. Due to the close fit between the skin and the socket skin problems are very common causing discomfort and in many cases prevent the patient from wearing it for more than short periods of time. In the past, the majority of lower limb amputees have been diabetes patients where the illness causes blood circulation problems leading to the amputation. These patients often have additional health problems preventing them from living a normal and active life. Due to the increasing number of trauma patients and returning soldiers with combat injuries the demographic of amputees are rapidly changing. Young veterans would like to return to a normal life and stay active to enjoy their work, family and hobbies but the external prosthetics makes this hard and in some cases impossible. Transcutaneous osseointegrated prosthetics could change this situation and provide enhanced prosthetic devices that would allow the amputee to lead an active and normal life.

$975,000

Fayetteville State University
1200 Murchison Road
Fayetteville, NC  28301

The number of social workers and mental health service providers familiar with the military culture and the use of prevention and intervention methods during times of war have significantly decreased.  The increased deployments of the military in support of combat operations overseas have taken a toll on these individuals.  This shortage increases the probability of the military’s social workers becoming strained from the increased caseloads of military families and injured soldiers suffering from the psychological effects of war and extreme environments. Civilian social workers serve the military population on a myriad of psychological issues but few have specialized training required to properly treat military-related issues. This program will create a network to facilitate this training.
 

$2,000,000

Fayetteville State University
1200 Murchison Road
Fayetteville, NC  28301

Through the Center for Critical Language and Culture at FSU, military personnel and stakeholders will be able to receive language and cultural instruction in areas identified as “priority” by the Department of Defense.  CCLC will enable deployed military personnel to better communicate and establish relationships with populations of strategic importance.  Such soft-power techniques will promote trust and help avert preventable conflicts – saving lives and money.

$1,080,000

Wake Forest University, Reynolda Campus
239 Manchester Hall
Winston-Salem, NC  27109

Adaptive cyber defense will enable member organizations of computer infrastructure to automatically detect emerging threats, repair damage, and share solutions while preserving proprietary data.  Human direction is retained without requiring human control. The method is more efficient at finding threats than current systems and quickly ramps up and down to defend against threats. The method is transformational in that it is truly an adaptive cyber defense technology that can protect large infrastructures and coalitions. The learning swarm functions like a colony organism much like ants in the real world. The decentralized approach moves analysis to the data sources. The decentralized approach facilitates collaborative defense without compromising proprietary information on organization member computers.
With increasing frequency assets in the USA are undergoing cyber attack. The origin of the attacks is most often outside the US where there is little or no opportunity to shut down the operation. Use of this approach to attach US resources is of interest to rough nations and terrorist groups with limited resources. Shutting down the power grid or an airport even for one day costs many times the cost of the proposed project.

$ 5,000,000

North Carolina National Guard
4105 Reedy Creek Rd
Raleigh, NC  27607

The North Carolina National Guard would like to provide an interactive, disc-based historical record of each Command, unit, and personal history to every servicemember to honor and recognize their service. Each interactive disc is packaged inside either a hardbound journal or photobook, containing up to 2,000 digital pages with photos and videos, text and music, documents and weblinks.
Military Units would organize and integrate collected content from personal records, and the Historian’s and Public Affairs offices (photos, videos, documents, text, honors, newsletters, rosters, bios, etc.) into an interactive “record of service” to be given each Servicemember in recognition of their Service on an annual basis. This may act as a communication tool to help them share their experience with family and friends as a means to strengthen understanding and support for the US Military. A “master” copy from each Unit would be submitted to each Branch historical and public affairs department for their archives, as well as to the National Archives, Center for Military History and the Library of Congress.

$3,100,000

ARDEC
University of North Carolina Charlotte
9201 University City Boulevard
Charlotte, NC  28223

Self-Aware Manufacturing (SAM) will eliminate costly and unpredictable trial-and-error process development using setup parts, and the continual manual adjustment of machine tools. SAM will eliminate the scrap that results from unmeasured errors, and will make existing machine tools as well as new equipment more productive and more accurate by an order of magnitude. Higher-precision machines and processes will enable new manufacturing practices; will improve part quality, will improve assembly processes, and will improve the capability and productivity of existing manufacturing facilities, thereby enabling the Army to improve productivity and precision across the entire US manufacturing supply base. This 4-year effort will include the deployment of new processes to industry, enhancing productivity and efficiency and enabling the workforce to do more with less.

$6,000,000


University of North Carolina – Charlotte
9201 University City Blvd
Charlotte, NC  28223

Detection of trace and bulk explosives remains a top priority and a technically challenging problem.  This program investigates the detection and chemical analysis of explosive material signatures.  The use of conventional high explosives and homemade explosives for the construction of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) remains a significant threat to our troops.  Initial efforts are directed toward fielding a capability by using deployed assets that are currently used for the detection of chemical and biological warfare agents.  These analytical methodologies and technologies can be exploited for the detection of trace and bulk explosive.
The funding of this program will enable development through a consortium with Research Triangle Institute (RTI), University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC) and General Dynamics Armament and Technical Products (a leading provider of chem-bio products such as JBPDS [Joint Biological Point Detection System] and JSLSCAD [Joint Services Lightweight Stand-off Chemical Agent Detection]).
The Advanced Detection of Hazardous Material (ADHM) will:
•Allow rapid fielding of initial capabilities and leverage off of RTI’s efforts working on advanced sensor technologies and micro fabrication of these devices.
•Take advantage of UNCC’s advanced optics center and GDATP’s investment in core detection methods and production of key Chem-bio programs.
•Enable the Government to leverage this consortium to upgrade currently deployed assets.
•Support dual use of technology as a more cost effect way of developing capabilities and many of the technologies proposed have use in military and civilian markets.
•Provide upgraded capabilities that benefit the warfighter in their mission against explosive devices, but the improved technology would correlate to the current Chem/Bio mission since many of the techniques and technologies are common to both detection of explosives and chemical/biological warfare agents.
 

$5,000,000

Methodist University
5400 Ramsey Street
Fayetteville, NC  28311

There is a need to improve our ability to detect gamma rays associated with dangerous material by utilizing light weight, handheld devices which can be deployed in large numbers to provide a thorough search of large areas as quickly as possible.  Methodist University Department of Chemistry will explore the growth and properties of doped oxides and film morphology to develop low cost growth techniques for mixed oxide films and related advanced materials.  In turn, this will provide the basis for the subsequent development of low cost, hand-held, sensitive gamma ray detectors, suitable for defense and homeland security operations. 

 

Subcommittee:  Defense
Agency:  Defense Health Program
Account:  Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation
Program Title: Breast Cancer Research Program 
FY10 Amount: $150 million
President’s Budget Request: $150million
Request Amount: $150 million

Subcommittee:  Defense
Agency:  Army Aircraft Procurement
Account:  UH-60 Blackhawk (Myp)
Program Title: UH-60 Blackhawk Helicopter
FY10 Amount: $0
President’s Budget Request: $1.226 billion
Request Amount: $188.5 million

Subcommittee:  Defense
Agency:  Army Aircraft Procurement
Account:  Utility Helicopter Mods
Program Title: Utility Helicopter Mods
FY10 Amount: $0
President’s Budget Request: $57 million
Request Amount: $17 million

 

Military-Construction

$13,100,000

Pope Air Force Base
5446 Reilly Road
Pope Air Force Base, NC 28308

This project will replace the present fire station that was built in 1956 and designed for approximately 40 authorizations.  Today, the Pope Air Force Base Fire Protection Flight has 86 authorizations. 

This project will provide an adequately sized and configured Crash/Fire/Rescue Station that meets Air Force requirements.  The new facility will provide fire protection and fire fighting services for base facilities and aircraft crash rescue/fire fighting on Pope Air Force Base and the 4 additional auxiliary airfields off-base.

The facility will include space for vehicle parking, equipment storage, 24-hour crew quarters, administration, training, vehicle/equipment maintenance, 24-hour emergency response call center, biohazard clean room, chemical agent storage and all other associated space needed for a fully functional Crash/Fire/Rescue Station.

$29,000,000

Fort Bragg, North Carolina
2175 Reilly Road, Stop A
Fort Bragg, North Carolina  28310-5000
   
BRAC 2005 federal law moved Forces Command (FORSCOM) and US Army Reserve Command (USARC) from Fort McPherson, GA to Fort Bragg, NC in a new combined Headquarters Facility.  This facility supports 2,471 full time Active, Reserve, and civilian personnel with joint operations center to accomplish assigned missions of command and control of assigned units.  Due to lack of land and BRAC funding, the physical location of the Headquarters does not meet the Department of Army requirement for all facility parking to be within 1/4 mile of the combined Headquarters.  There are 1150 parking spaces outside the 1/4 mile limit.  The logical location to construct the parking garage is on top of an existing 280 space parking lot. The total requirement is approximately 1430 parking spaces.  Without this parking garage over 60% of the combined FORSCOM and USARC Headquarters staff will walk more than 1/4 mile in potential unsuitable weather conditions.  This will result in a higher sick rate and low morale in this employee group impacting the overall Headquarters effectiveness.
CURRENT SITUATION:
Forces Command (FORSCOM) and US Army Reserve Command (USARC) Headquarters will relocate to Fort Bragg/Pope Air Force Base (AFB) as part of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) 2005 initiative which recommended that Fort McPherson and Fort Gillem, GA (current FORSCOM and USARC Headquarters location) be closed. There are currently five proposed surface parking areas up to 1/2 mile away from the main Headquarters to service the Headquarters.

$13,400,000

Fort Bragg, North Carolina
2175 Reilly Road, Stop A
Fort Bragg, North Carolina  28310-5000

This project is required to provide adequate parking for the 82d Airborne Division's Command and Control Facility.  The current Division Headquarters project assumed less than one parking space per person.  This is no longer an acceptable number and this project will provide the required number of spaces.  Fort Bragg's land is at a premium and the Headquarter's site is constrained by existing structures and an endangered species, the red-cockaded woodpecker.  To preserve habitat and reduce the construction footprint, Fort Bragg needs to build its parking capacity vertically. 
CURRENT SITUATION:
Currently, the parking for the command elements of the 82nd Airborne Division headquarters is located in several different parking lots at three separate locations.  The main parking lot at Ridgway Hall, a converted Non-Commissioned Officer Club that was constructed in 1960, has only 55% of its required parking and does not accommodate the larger staff. The mapping imagery occupies a separate facility in the main post area that was constructed as a horse barn in the 1920s and provides less than 50% of its required parking. The division public affairs office occupies yet another building that is a converted barracks. Existing parking cannot accommodate an increase in personnel growth associated with Army Transformation.
 

$8,500,000

North Carolina National Guard
4105 Reedy Creek Rd
Raleigh, NC  27607

The 156th Airlift Squadron, North Carolina Air National Guard, Charlotte, NC, performs the vital mission of training, testing, certifying, planning, and scheduling C-130H aircrews in support of State and Federal missions.  The current facility does not meet mission needs, life-safety standards, environmental standards, administrative, training and operational space.  The facility was built 35 years ago and designed to support an Airlift Squadron that had 60 crewmembers. Due to mission increase, that same unit has 120 crewmembers with a corresponding growth in all support personnel.
The numerous inadequacies of the current facility impact federal and state mission readiness by affecting aircrew training, storage/accountability of high-value equipment, poor work environment, and constraining infrastructure. A construction project of this size will benefit the local economy.

$18,000,000

Fort Bragg
2175 Reilly Road, Stop A
Fort Bragg, North Carolina  28310-5000

This FY 2011 funding request secures federal funding for Phase 2 of a 2 phase project to complete the final 2 miles of the Murchison Road project.  The project will allow the closure of Bragg Boulevard through Fort Bragg to civilian traffic, a necessary action for antiterrorism and force protection.  The public traffic currently using Bragg Boulevard will be redirected to Murchison Road, which requires the widening of Murchison Road from 4 to 6 lanes, with interchanges connecting to Fort Bragg.   
The Murchison Road Phase 2 project includes finance design, right-of-way and construction of new off-installation entrances to Army activities, urgently needed improvement of existing highways serving Army activities, the federal government share of the cost of relocating highways severed by expansion or construction of new Army facilities, and alterations to roads near Army activities to accommodate special military vehicles.  The project widens approximately 4 miles of Murchison Road from 4-lanes to 6-lanes (to include interchanges at Randolph St. and Honeycutt Road) to accommodate traffic redirected due to the closure of Bragg Boulevard that is needed for antiterrorism and force protection.  The project also includes road improvements to provide a new entrance to an existing elementary school. This Phase 2 is for the Army's share of approximately 2 miles of 6 lanes of Murchison Road from the Honeycutt Road past Butner Road tying into Spring Lake (including the Randolph Street interchange). Failure to provide federal funds will preclude both the improvement of Murchison Road and the closure of Fort Bragg Boulevard to non-DOD traffic. This will hinder Fort Bragg's ability to adequately secure the installation.

Commerce, Justice, Science

$300,000

Monroe Police Department
P.O. Box 69
Monroe, NC 28110

This request would reprogram FY2009 funds to allow the Monroe Police department to purchase digital radios rather than in-care cameras. 

$1,000,000

Southeastern North Carolina Regional Economic Development Commission
P.O. Box 2256
Elizabethtown, NC 28337

This initiative focuses on creating jobs by marketing to international markets and to foreign firms that want to establish facilities in the U.S. market. With the Port of Wilmington, several major multinational corporations, productive agribusiness and other industry clusters in the southeast region, there is untapped opportunity to integrate Southeastern North Carolina’s economy more closely with the global economy. Founded by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1994, North Carolina’s Southeast is the ideal entity to gather the technical and leadership resources needed to accomplish this Initiative. This proposal is supported by the Technical Advisory Group for North Carolina’s Southeast, which is represented by 29 different organizations, including all local economic development organizations, NC Ports, Dept. of Commerce., Dept. of Agriculture, community college system, universities, and several private firms and utilities. Additionally, North Carolina’s Southeast will collaborate with the Southeastern Economic Development Commission, the regional EDA (Economic Development Administration) organization for southeastern North Carolina to follow through on this initiative.

$750,000 -

Methodist University
5400 Ramsey Street
Fayetteville, NC 28311

The Cyber Security Education and Training Program is responding to the needs of the local community and the State of North Carolina to increase advanced technology used in the field.  In North Carolina, there is a critical need for qualified crime scene investigators/analysts to assist police and sheriff departments in the collection, analysis and preservation of forensic evidence.  To solve Internet-based crimes, students must be trained in the interactive computer communications capability and information service used exclusively for law enforcement, criminal justice and the public safety community.

$1,000,000 -

Textile/Clothing Technology Corporation
5651 Dillard Drive
Cary, NC 27518

Textile Clothing Technology Corporation is a not-for-profit corporation engaged in research and development to enhance competitive advantage of apparel sewn products and hosiery industry sectors, with support from more than two hundred companies and affiliations with similar organizations.

$866,000

Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office
700 East 4th Street
Charlotte, NC 28202

The most significant value of the Consolidated Data Sharing Portal project is the ability of the end product to provide the criminal justice user critical information pertaining to individuals encountered in the criminal justice system.  Not only is this a safety issue for officers, it also protects citizens by ensuring undesirable individuals don't slip through the cracks when it comes to sex offender verification or gun permit issuance.  The CDSP project will also increase efficiency in how users access the information, reducing downtime currently experienced because of the multiple systems used to retrieve data.

$500,000

North Carolina State University
Campus Box 7214, Admin Services III
Raleigh, NC 27695

The National Textile Center (NTC) is a research consortium that serves the USA Fiber/Textile/Fiber Products/Retail Complex
THE NATIONAL TEXTILE CENTER
The National Textile Center (NTC) is a research consortium that serves the USA Fiber/Textile/Fiber Products/Retail Complex.
NTC was established to achieve three primary goals:
1.    Research: To discover, design and develop new materials, innovative and improved manufacturing, and integrated systems essential to the success of a modern U.S. textile enterprise.
2.    Education: To train personnel, establish industrial partnerships and create transfer mechanisms to ensure the utilization of technologies developed.
3.    Partnership: To strengthen the nation's textile research and educational efforts by uniting diverse experts and resources in unique collaborative projects.
We believe that this program continues to play an extremely critical role in helping to enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. textile and apparel industry, which employs nearly 600,000 workers nationwide and contributes nearly $60 billion to the nation’s gross national product on an annual basis.  Moreover, it should be noted that this industry is a primary supplier of employment to women and minority workers, with many of these jobs located in depressed rural areas, as well as major inner cities.  In North Carolina, 1,340 companies (9% public, 91% private) employ over 120,000 people in 90 of the 100 counties.  (See NC Textile Connect at www.textileconnect.com).
The NTC provides a unique and highly effective structure for maximizing fundamental research and development efforts of value to the textile and apparel sector.  Through the combined knowledge and expertise of the nation’s leading textile research universities, the NTC is leading an effort to address all key aspects of the textile industry, from fiber production to marketing.  These efforts include research in many areas related to critical national needs, such as protective clothing, biomedical textiles, electronics, alternative energy sources, and environmental sustainability.  While meeting its goals of research, education and industry partnership, the NTC also addresses concerns related to workforce training and job creation.  The value of new textile products and processes that have been created by NTC research is well over $300 million -- nearly 3 times the federal investment in NTC to date.  It is for this reason that NTC enjoys widespread industry participation and in-kind support.
THE NATIONAL TEXTILE CENTER
The National Textile Center (NTC) is a research consortium that serves the USA Fiber/Textile/Fiber Products/Retail Complex…
NTC was established to achieve three primary goals:
1.    Research: To discover, design and develop new materials, innovative and improved manufacturing, and integrated systems essential to the success of a modern U.S. textile enterprise.
2.    Education: To train personnel, establish industrial partnerships and create transfer mechanisms to ensure the utilization of technologies developed.
3.    Partnership: To strengthen the nation's textile research and educational efforts by uniting diverse experts and resources in unique collaborative projects.
We believe that this program continues to play an extremely critical role in helping to enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. textile and apparel industry, which employs nearly 600,000 workers nationwide and contributes nearly $60 billion to the nation’s gross national product on an annual basis.  Moreover, it should be noted that this industry is a primary supplier of employment to women and minority workers, with many of these jobs located in depressed rural areas, as well as major inner cities.  In North Carolina, 1,340 companies (9% public, 91% private) employ over 120,000 people in 90 of the 100 counties.  (See NC Textile Connect at www.textileconnect.com).
The NTC provides a unique and highly effective structure for maximizing fundamental research and development efforts of value to the textile and apparel sector.  Through the combined knowledge and expertise of the nation’s leading textile research universities, the NTC is leading an effort to address all key aspects of the textile industry, from fiber production to marketing.  These efforts include research in many areas related to critical national needs, such as protective clothing, biomedical textiles, electronics, alternative energy sources, and environmental sustainability.  While meeting its goals of research, education and industry partnership, the NTC also addresses concerns related to workforce training and job creation.  The value of new textile products and processes that have been created by NTC research is well over $300 million -- nearly 3 times the federal investment in NTC to date.  It is for this reason that NTC enjoys widespread industry participation and in-kind support.
Importance
Breakthroughs such as: 1) Innovative aircrafts made primarily from textile composite materials, 2) Protective clothing for firefighters, paramedics and policemen, and 3) Electrical energy stored in textiles have become a reality because researchers have been able to collaborate on advanced materials and textile projects through funding provided from the National Textile Center. 
For more than 15 years, the National Textile Center has strengthened the nation’s research and educational efforts by uniting faculty from eight leading United States research universities in unique collaborative projects in a manner that enhances the efficiency of resource usage through circumventing duplication of effort.  The advanced materials and textiles resulting from this research support sectors such as defense, aerospace, biotechnology, energy, semiconductors, electronics, nanotechnology and homeland security. 
Research programs sponsored by NTC at North Carolina State University College of Textiles have been conducted in 4 areas, namely Materials, Fabrication, Chemical Processes, and Integrated Systems.  Currently 9 research projects are funded under this program. 
Breakthroughs such as: 1) Innovative aircrafts made primarily from textile composite materials, 2) Protective clothing for firefighters, paramedics and policemen, and 3) Electrical energy stored in textiles have become a reality because researchers have been able to collaborate on advanced materials and textile projects through funding provided from the National Textile Center. 
For more than 15 years, the National Textile Center has strengthened the nation’s research and educational efforts by uniting faculty from eight leading United States research universities in unique collaborative projects in a manner that enhances the efficiency of resource usage through circumventing duplication of effort.  The advanced materials and textiles resulting from this research support sectors such as defense, aerospace, biotechnology, energy, semiconductors, electronics, nanotechnology and homeland security. 
Research programs sponsored by NTC at North Carolina State University College of Textiles have been conducted in 4 areas, namely Materials, Fabrication, Chemical Processes, and Integrated Systems.  Currently 9 research projects are funded under this program. 
 

$1,500,000

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department
601 East Trade Street
Charlotte, NC 28202

Charlotte has continued to see a substantial increase in gang activity.  There are over 1,655 documented gang members and 199 gang affiliates in approximately 151 different street gangs in Charlotte-Mecklenburg.  Between the years 2003-2008, the number of gangs has grown from 30 to 151 (403% increase), the number of gang members and associates has grown from 606 to 1,854 (206% increase), and the number of gang related incidents has grown from 499 to 1,340 (169% increase).
The Gang of One Pilot Program is a gang prevention initiative that provides a network of resources to youth who are being pressured to join a gang or need assistance to get out of a gang.  The resource network responses are based upon individual needs.  These responses include prevention, intervention, and education. 
Since 2004, Gang of One has received over 2,600 calls to its Hotline, provided gang education and gang resistance training to approximately 15,000 adults and youth in over 400 workshops, and assisted over 115 youth with agency resources in support of gang disassociation.  For FY2011 is seeking to expand current programs, convene a "best practice" Multidisciplinary Gang Intervention Team, support new community-based programs, and initiate a longitudinal assessment of programs.
In addition, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD) is restructuring its Police Athletic League to a Police Activities League (PAL) which provides a broad range of programs to at-risk youth in the community.  The goal is to provide programs that help these at-risk youth academically, introduce them to possible career choices, and provide a broad range of supervised recreational activities that extend beyond sports in an effort to give them the necessary skills to make appropriate life decisions.  PAL also seeks to establish a community-based safe haven that would engage at-risk teens who reside within various underserved areas of the community, as there are currently few teen specific programs within Charlotte-Mecklenburg.

$2,000,000

Cumberland County
117 Dick Street, Room 512
Fayetteville, NC 28301

This project ensures the safety of residents and the first responders who protect them. Since 1996, the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) and Fayetteville Police Department (FPD) have utilized the 800MHz Radio System.  In 2005, the City and County shared in an upgrade of the system at a cost of $4.7 million, splitting the cost based on number of radios used by each.  After 2009 the system cannot be expanded without converting to a P-25 compliant system.  FPD and CCSO have identified areas in the unincorporated areas of the County and in the newly annexed areas of the City with less than the standard 95% coverage, using a 3-watt, hand-held radio in the street.  To reach adequate coverage, major upgrades are needed and the system must be converted to a strictly digital system by year 2014.

The City of Fayetteville and Cumberland County are pursuing funds in this account because there are no state funds available for this purpose as they are all dedicated to getting the state system implemented.

$81,000

Stanly County Sheriff's Office
223 South Second Street
Albemarle, NC 28001

The office, like others in our area, is continually striving to improve the delivery of service to our citizens, while providing the officers and courts with accurate information for disposition of criminal and civil proceedings.  This project will improve public safety, accountability, and law enforcement services.  In these hard economic times, funding for a project such as this is impossible for local taxpayers.

$500,000

North Carolina Sheriffs' Association, Inc.
P.O. Box 20049
Raleigh, NC 27619

The purpose of this project is to increase public safety through efficient operations at the sheriffs’ offices.  The services provided to the sheriffs through this project will serve to ensure the consistency and uniformity of the services provided throughout the state by the individual sheriffs’ offices.  This project will benefit taxpayers by reducing local and federal cost to track and apprehend criminals.

$1,350,000

Montgomery County
102 East Spring Street
Troy, NC 27371

The purpose of this request is to secure funding to improve the communications for all public safety and emergency management agencies in Montgomery County.  The County currently has an antiquated system that often causes a breakdown of communication between agencies and 911 dispatching caused mainly from old repeaters and dead zones throughout the County. The funds would allow the County to upgrade to the state VIPER system and will provide a close to flawless line of communications between all those who are responding or communicating with an emergency or any adverse situations.
 

$1,048,000

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department
601 East Trade Street
Charlotte, NC 28202

Charlotte has continued to see a substantial increase in gang activity.  There are over 1,655 documented gang members and 199 gang affiliates in approximately 151 different street gangs in Charlotte-Mecklenburg.  Between the years 2003-2008, the number of gangs has grown from 30 to 151 (403% increase), the number of gang members and associates has grown from 606 to 1,854 (206% increase), and the number of gang related incidents has grown from 499 to 1,340 (169% increase).
The Gang of One Pilot Program is a gang prevention initiative that provides a network of resources to youth who are being pressured to join a gang or need assistance to get out of a gang.  The resource network responses are based upon individual needs.  These responses include prevention, intervention, and education. 
Since 2004, Gang of One has received over 2,600 calls to its Hotline, provided gang education and gang resistance training to approximately 15,000 adults and youth in over 400 workshops, and assisted over 115 youth with agency resources in support of gang disassociation.  For FY2011 is seeking to expand current programs, convene a "best practice" Multidisciplinary Gang Intervention Team, support new community-based programs, and initiate a longitudinal assessment of programs.
In addition, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department (CMPD) is restructuring its Police Athletic League to a Police Activities League (PAL) which provides a broad range of programs to at-risk youth in the community.  The goal is to provide programs that help these at-risk youth academically, introduce them to possible career choices, and provide a broad range of supervised recreational activities that extend beyond sports in an effort to give them the necessary skills to make appropriate life decisions.  PAL also seeks to establish a community-based safe haven that would engage at-risk teens who reside within various underserved areas of the community, as there are currently few teen specific programs within Charlotte-Mecklenburg.

$25,000

Star Police Department
454 South Main Street
Star, NC 27356

The VIPER system will add value to our already strong police service.  This communication system will improve our police department and help Star continue to enjoy one of the lowest crime rates in Montgomery County.  If we are unable to upgrade to VIPER radios, our officers will experience communication interruptions while on duty, thus limiting their effectiveness while partnering with other public safety agencies within the county.

$25,000

Candor Police Department
P.O. Box 220
Candor, NC 27229

Candor is dealing with a declining industrial tax base and faces a tough challenge of maintaining our public infrastructure and other municipal services.  Maintaining and upgrading the service capabilities of our police department will benefit our citizens, both individual and corporate, in the future.  This task requires upgrading our police radios.  In the event of a disaster, natural or otherwise, these radios will allow our police to communicate directly with other local, state and federal agency first responders.

$2,500,000 -

Cabarrus County Sheriff’s Office
P.O. Box 707
Concord, NC 28026

The Cabarrus County radio communication system is one lightening strike away from total system failure.  This is primarily due to the age of the current analog radio system. Many of the major radio components have reached their end-of-life and therefore replacing malfunctioning parts become very difficult, if not impossible. 

$600,000

NC Department of Crime Control and Public Safety
4701 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699

In this time of extreme economic distress in North Carolina, the COMCON is totally technologically out of date and funds for new capital investments such as the COMCON are not available. The technology being replaced is almost 20 years old and cannot provide the modern services needed by the federal, state, and local public safety agencies that use, or to whom the COMCON is available 24/7/365.  Federal agencies have used NCSHP communications services or had them available for use 24/7/365 for more than 50 years and have never contributed any support of any kind and the state does not intend to charge for these services going forward.

$1,000,000

Concord Police Department
P.O. Box 308
Concord, NC 29026

Currently radios operate on the original 800 MHz frequency range.  Operating on a different frequency range from other agencies hinders these departments from communicating with each other and state and federal law enforcement agencies, thus creating a problem when multi-jurisdictional incidents occur.  With federal assistance, these two departments are replacing their mobile and handheld radios prior to upgrading the radio system.  FY 2011 funds will be used to begin radio system upgrades by purchasing P25 system hardware for tower sites.

$600,000

Anson County Sheriff's Department
119 North Washington Street
Wadesboro, NC 28170

This project enhances public safety, officer safety, and puts sophisticated geospatial intelligence information into the hands of those responding to fire, crisis, 911 calls, and more.  In this way, they can better respond to the situations at hand and do so more safely.  Imagery requires very little maintenance and is self-sustaining by the counties after the initial investment.  Further, should any natural disaster occur in the District impacting the counties involved in this project, new imagery is guaranteed to be taken within 24 hours to allow for a before and after analysis for the purpose of search and rescue, cleanup, and rebuilding.

Subcommittee: Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agency
Agency: Department of Justice
Account: Office of Justice Programs
Program Title: Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program
FY10 Amount: $519,000,000
President’s Budget Request: $519,000,000
Request Amount: $1,100,000,000

Subcommittee: Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agency
Agency: Department of Justice
Account: Community Oriented Policing Services
Program Title: Community Oriented Policing Services
FY10 Amount: $298,000,000
President’s Budget Request: $600,000,000
Request Amount: $1,047,119,000

Subcommittee:
Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agency
Agency: Department of Justice
Account: Office of Justice Programs 
Program Title: Regional Information Sharing Activities 
FY10 Amount: $45,000,000
President’s Budget Request: $9,000,000
Request Amount: $65,000,000

Subcommittee: Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agency
Agency: National Science Foundation
Account: National Science Foundation
Program Title: National Science Foundation – Total Agency 
FY10 Amount: $6,872,510,000
President’s Budget Request: $7,424,400,000
Request Amount: $7,424,400,000

Interior-Environment

$300,000

The Land Trust for Central NC on behalf of the US Forest Service
215 Depot St
Salisbury, NC 28144

This project will add the Tucker property to the Uwharrie National Forest, The Tucker Property, is a 180 acre tract that would offer access to the Uwharrie National Forest's Badin Recreational Area off Highway 109. The Land Trust has envisioned a loop trail of 50-60 miles that can ultimately connect the Badin Recreation Area and Badin Lake across Highway 109 through USFS Land and Land Trust land to the Uwharrie River, back through USFS to the Uwharrie Trail, and ultimately also down to Lake Tillery.

$517,424

City of Locust, Public Works Dept
161 Kennedy Drive
Locust , NC 28097

A number of the existing septic systems have been repaired in the project area and one (1) septic system permit was even denied. These issues can present hazards to public health. An extension to the municipal sewer service will eliminate the health hazard issues and allow the current forty (40) residences to have a dependable long-range solution for their problematic septic systems.

$1,120,900

Town of Oakboro
P.O. Box 610
Oakboro, NC 28129

This request is the result of a multi-year effort by the Town of Oakboro to secure necessary funding to remedy a serious environmental condition resulting from the Town's failing wastewater collection system. The Town is experiencing chronic overflows of untreated waste-water induced by rainfall events. The Town has initiated limited repairs and upgrades to abate the situation but lacks the capital resources necessary to fully abate the situation. The Town of Oakboro is currently considered a "High Unit Cost" provider with combined water and sewer rates above 1.5 times the monthly median household income. This project is considered a regional project as the Town provides waste-water services, including transportation and treatment, to the Town of Stanfield, City of Locust and to Portions of Stanly County.

$241,210

Town of Stanfield
103 West Stanly St
Stanfield, NC 28163

This is a major health issue for this small community and we are currently struggling to pay for the first phases of the sewer system installation that was done in 1999. They do not have the resources nor funds to fix this problem that was created before the Town had the responsibility to ensure that land could perk before allowing construction of homes. This problem was indeed inherited and is creating a health issue with fecal matter in the surrounding areas, waterways and yards.

$775,000

Stanly County
1000 N First Street, Suite 10
Albemarle, NC 28001

The project, The Tarheel Challenge Academy and the related water and sewer project, will no doubt have both an economic and a human service impact on Stanly County. The academy will provide an economic stimulus to Stanly County by creating jobs and local business opportunities.
Additionally, the academy will provide the necessary life skills, education and ancillary services to help over 250 at-risk youth become productive, self-sufficient members of society on an annual basis.

$2.5 Million

Town of Hoffman
2176 Caddell Road
Hoffman, NC 28347

The Town desires to construct a wastewater collection system that will eliminate failing septic systems and promote growth. This growth will likely be facilitated due to the Town's proximity to Camp Mackall and Fort Bragg, and the recent widening of U.S. Highway 1 through the Town provides improved access. The sewer service will also likely bring in additional businesses based on the many inquiries the Town has already received regarding the availability of sewer service.
 

$546,700


City of Locust
Public Works Dept
161 Kennedy Drive
Locust , NC 28097

This project is essential to Locust and Stanfield's ability to fully and effectively utilize their respective sewer capacities, a flow equalization basin is needed at the confluence of their common force main.

$2,123,000

Town of Midland
4293-B Hwy. 24/27
Midland, NC 28107

The purpose of the Midland CIP is two-fold. It establishes a strong base for community and economic development. First, The Midland CIP is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it gives the citizens of Midland an immediate relief for the long-standing septic problems in the area. Furthermore, the direct benefit extends beyond town citizens by giving those outside the city limits the option of using the sewer system instead of septic. Second, the Midland CIP provides valuable infrastructure to surrounding Southern Cabarrus County with the possibility of extending into NC District 8. Although Midland contains a major north-south, east-west highway crossing and railroad access, it is still undeveloped with industry.

$700,000

The Land Trust for Central NC on behalf of the US Forest Service
215 Depot St
Salisbury, NC 28144

This project will add the Little Long Mountain tract to the Uwharrie National Forest, Little Long Mountain is a spectacular tract that fills the only remaining gap in the Uwharrie Trail in Montgomery County and would add nearly 7 miles to the Uwharrie National Recreation Trail, bringing it all the way up to High Pine Church Road in Randolph County. Filling this one gap in the trail also gets to within one more property of completing the entire Uwharrie Trail, through the Birkhead Wilderness Area in Randolph County. Doing so would extend the current 20.5 mile trail to between 35 and 40 miles long. With just the one property in this funding request (Little Long Mountain) in Montgomery County, the trail could be connected up to the NC Scenic Byway of High Pine Church Road and add nearly 7 miles to the trail within the next eighteen months.

$2.5 Million

Richmond County
P.O. Box 504
Rockingham, NC 28380

This funding will enable Richmond County to expand the water distribution system to areas not currently served by county water to reach citizens currently served by private wells.

$648,000

City of Laurinburg
P.O. Box 249
Laurinburg, NC 28353

This project consists of the replacement of an old asbestos/concrete water main with approximately 5,100 feet of 20 inch pvc and some ductile iron pipe. This old water main is the sole transmission main from the Laurinburg Water Treatment Plant to the City's primary elevated storage tank on Caledonia Road and is the exclusive water source for Scotland Memorial Hospital. The transmission main is prone to break and is in constant need of repair. This main is a very important line within the structure of the City's system. It directly serves the hospital which serves Scotland County and the surrounding area. Since this line is important in maintaining the integrity of the City's system it is also important to a much larger area because Laurinburg supplies water for the Scotland County Water System and is also interconnected with the water system at the Laurinburg Maxton Airport.

$2,437,027

Montgomery County
102 East Spring Street
Troy, NC 27371

Sewer service is planned to include 4 gravity sewer lines, one pump station and associated force main to the Town of Biscoe collection system. Water service is planned to require line upgrades, booster pump station improvements and a pressure reducing station. Montgomery County has experienced an extreme loss of jobs in recent years. This would help with line upgrades, booster pump station improvements and a pressure reducing station for Montgomery County.

$2,143,979

Town of Wadesboro
603 Woodland Drive
Wadesboro, NC 28170

South Wadesboro, located in an economically depressed rural county, has a large residential area where over 160 homes currently have no sewage service.  Septic tanks in the area have a high rate of failure, and currently sewage flows in open trenches within the Town’s neighborhoods.  Funding for this project will help create needed water and sewage infrastructure, and help local, state, and federal governments to provide needed sanitation infrastructure and improve public health.

$1 million

Cities of Concord, Kannapolis, and Albemarle, North Carolina
Concord Water Resources Department
P.O. Box 308
Concord, NC 28026

Funding for this project will be used to construct an 87,500 feet water line running from Albemarle to Concord. The Cities of Concord and Kannapolis' combined water demand is surpassing their capacity. It is more regionally beneficial and cost effective to utilize existing potable water sources by connecting nearby public systems than developing new water sources. This water line will run through a sparsely populated area, which will minimize construction cost and inconvenience to the general public. The proposed water line will run parallel to NC 49 from an existing 30inch stub near the intersection of NC 49 and Main Street in Richfield to the termination of an existing 30inch line near the Cabarrus Arena and Events Center located at the intersection NC 49 and Old Airport Road. A portion of the water line will be constructed along Fisher Road, Moose Road, and NC 73 in order to avoid any major impact to existing development along NC 49. Also associated with the project is the construction of two water booster stations, a ground storage tank, and approximately 12,000 feet of 24inch line needed to access an existing elevated tank owned and operated by the City of Concord.

Subcommittee:  Interior
Agency:  Environmental Protection Agency
Account:  Environmental Programs and Management
Program Title: Rural Water EPA Technical Assistance
Program Description: Provides technical assistance to small rural communities to ensure that their drinking water and wastewater, ground water, source water protection efforts are in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act, Clean Water Act, and other federal laws.
Request Amount: $16.8 million

Subcommittee: Interior and Environment
Agency: Fish and Wildlife Service
Account: State and Tribal Wildlife Grants
Amount Requested: $100,000,000
Program Title: State and Tribal Wildlife Grants 
Describe Program Request: The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants Program is the nation’s core program to prevent wildlife from becoming endangered in every state.  Adequate and consistent funding for in essential to fulfilling this shared federal-state mission.  Taking action to conserve wildlife before it becomes endangered is environmentally sound and fiscally responsible.  This work creates thousands of jobs and stimulates the economy.  Now more than ever, we should be focusing limited resources on this kind of smart, effective conservation investment. 

Transportation - Urban Development

$660,000

Montgomery County
102 East Spring Street
Troy, NC 27371

The facility is needed to bring the county into compliance with state standards, provide a more humane treatment for captured animals, and encourage/promote animal adoption.

$2.5 Million

Laurinburg Institute
125 McGirts Bridge Rd
Laurinburg, NC 28353

McGirts Bridge Rd. from Main St. leading up to the campus and passing the campus for 5 miles should be resurfaced because it is not maintained and in good condition. Melton St., Speller St., & the road to the cemetery are all dirt roads from a dirt path and all are in need of being built and paved. Finally, Wall St. needs to be resurfaced Adequate transportation routes leading up to and around the school will lead to more commerce, more commerce leads to more revenue and more taxes therefore the project will eventually be a revenue generator for the city, state and federal government.

$1.5 million

City of Fayetteville
433 Hay Street
Fayetteville, NC 28301

The City of Fayetteville population growth and subsequent traffic congestion has generated additional demand for public transportation. Furthermore the City is striving to improve poor air quality and must take measures to retain its quality attainment status or risk losing valuable federal funding in a time of economic crisis. Therefore, the City must address transit capacity and expansion needs, while also addressing clean air issues, but without adding significantly to operating costs.

$2 million

North Carolina Department of Transportation Program Development Branch
1542 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699

This project proposes to extend the George Liles Parkway by constructing a four lane divided facility from SR 1304 (Roberta Road) to SR 1431 (Weddington Road) by widening existing roads and constructing on new locations. The proposed improvements will provide safety and mobility benefits. In addition, the project has regional significance because it is identified as a route on North Carolina's Strategic Highway Corridor system. This project is a high priority for NCDOT and has broad local support as well.

$2 million

North Carolina Department of Transportation Program Development Branch
1542 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699

Funds will be used for planning, design, and right-of-way acquisition for the widening of NC 3. This project is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because of the safety and mobility improvements the project will create.

$2.5 million

City of Kannapolis
P.O. Box 1199
Kannapolis, NC 28082

A major intersection where the two largest thoroughfares in the city meet, US 29/Cannon Boulevard and Dale Earnhardt Boulevard, is in need of intersection and turn lane improvements to keep an increasing amount of traffic flowing smoothly to the city's main business district and shopping areas. The importance of the intersection to downtown redevelopment, the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) and corridor enhancements along Dale Earnhardt Boulevard and Cannon Boulevard makes it a priority project for the City of Kannapolis. The project includes the construction of an eastbound left-turn lane on Dale Earnhardt Boulevard, a westbound left-turn lane on Dale Earnhardt Boulevard, a westbound right-turn lane on Dale Earnhardt Boulevard, a concrete median on westbound Dale Earnhardt Boulevard, and signalization of the intersection with metal strain poles. These improvements are identified in the NCRC's Traffic Impact Assessment as a requirement to mitigate the level of service at this intersection due to the traffic generated by the NCRC.  Kannapolis is seeking all available resources to prepare for and support the NCRC. This world-class campus will be a major economic engine for the city, and the upgrades to this major intersection are extremely important for improving accessibility to it.

$2.5 Million

Charlotte Area Transit System
600 E. Fourth St
Charlotte, NC 28202

The Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) is continuing to implement its 2030 Transit Corridor System Plan to develop primary transportation corridors, linking the area's key centers of economic activity. The Transit Corridor System Plan will support development of pedestrian friendly urban neighbors with a mixture of land uses, offer people a choice in meeting their mobility needs, increase transit's share of the local travel market, reduce Charlotte's dependence on overloaded and gridlocked roads, ease future air and noise pollution, and enhance the overall quality of life in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg area. When completed, the Transit System will serve more than two to three times as many transit riders as the present system. The corridors will function as an integrated system, providing connectivity with surrounding communities and institutions. 

$2.5 million

City of Concord- Concord Regional Airport
9000 Aviation Blvd
Concord, NC 28027

The current control tower at Concord Regional Airport (CRA) was originally built as an observation area for the airport, and was used for air traffic control work during Concord's May and October NASCAR races. When CRA became a Federal Contract Tower in 2001 the facility was upgraded to meet FAA specifications. Radar and other equipment have been added, which takes up all of the tower's useable space. Some equipment is even stored in a nearby office. Additionally, CRA's runway was recently extended from 5,500 feet to 7,400 feet. That extension was 1,900 feet to the north of the tower, which reduces the visual capacity of the controllers for aircraft at the north end. CRA is the busiest general aviation airport in the State of North Carolina. It is imperative that controllers have the visual capacity to safely guide all inbound and outbound flights. A new, higher tower will provide that additional visual capacity, thereby maximizing safety and use of the newly lengthened runway.

$940,000

Mecklenburg County Air Quality
600 E. 4th Street, 11th Floor
Charlotte, NC 28202

GRADE+ is a reimbursement program initiated and administered by Mecklenburg County Air Quality (MCAQ). The purpose of the program is to contribute towards achieving compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone for the Charlotte metro region. This is done by educating heavy-duty equipment owners about various ways to reduce exhaust emissions and to provide monetary assistance to those seeking to reduce the negative effects of mobile source exhaust on our regional air quality. This project will create 18 FTEs per $950,000 invested per year. Currently, Mecklenburg County and 12 other surrounding Counties are considered Non-Attainment for the ozone NAAQS: NC: Gaston, Cleveland, Lincoln, Iredell, Rowan, Stanly, Cabarrus, Union, and Anson. SC: York, Chester, and Lancaster.

$300,000

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Housing Partnership, Inc. (CMHP)
4601 Charlotte Park Drive, Suite 350
Charlotte, NC 28217

This request is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because the need for foreclosure prevention counseling services is increasing at a faster rate than current efforts can meet with static resources. There is a direct correlation between the recent economic crisis and financial illiteracy. In an effort to reduce this handicap and increase financial awareness, the foreclosure prevention counseling services will help incorporate a financial literacy curriculum for its homeownership counseling program. This effective implementation of this program can help stem the current rate of foreclosure in Charlotte and surrounding counties area and help to prevent future delinquency with proper financial management education.

$2.5 Million


City of Monroe
Charlotte Monroe Executive Airport
3900 Paul J. Helms Drive
Monroe, NC 28110

The runway and taxiways are being lengthened from 5,500 feet to 7,000 feet and being strengthened from 68,500 pounds per dual-wheel (DW) to 95,000 pounds per DW because the airport cannot support larger aircraft. This lack of capacity hinders service to local business and industry. Furthermore, the Charlotte Monroe Executive Airport is a reliever airport for Charlotte Douglas International Airport, yet certain planes cannot divert to Monroe given the runway's length and weight constraints.

$500,000

David H. Murdock Research Institute - 501(c)3.
150 Research Campus Drive
Kannapolis, NC 28081

The North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) in Kannapolis, NC has a specific requirement for connecting to high-speed optical networking between the campus and other academic and research intensive institutions within the state. With anchor tenants (including UNC Charlotte, UNC-Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, and Duke University) working and researching at the campus, the NCRC must be interconnected to the North Carolina Research and Education Network (NCREN) to achieve its mission to be the most technologically advanced biotechnology campus in the country. With upwards of 3000 scientists and research staff expected to work at the campus, access to the fiber optic network developed by MCNC and NCREN is critical to the success of the NCRC as researchers engage their peers and resources at other locations around the state (and beyond). Specifically, researchers at the NCRC will require high speed connectivity to conduct their experiments, engage in collaborative activities with other researchers, and to access and move large data sets between institutions.

$2.5 million

Town of Harrisburg
PO Box 100
Harrisburg, NC 28075

This proposal would result in a 13,000 linear foot, six-lane boulevard extension of Caldwell Road, and a 5,280 linear foot, three-lane extension of Plaza Road. The project would include three-bridge crossings, and would help alleviate congestion on Morehead Road and Rocky River Road, both major thoroughfares in the town’s transportation network.

$2.5 million

City of Kannapolis
P.O. Box 1199
Kannapolis, NC 28082

Rogers Lake Road and Main Street is one of the last remaining at-grade railroad crossings in the city. The current two-lane crossing and intersection do not have turn lanes, creating dangerous situations where traffic backs up over the railroad crossing and into the intersection with Ridge Avenue, another major transportation route.

$1 Million

City of Concord Transportation Department
26 Union Street South
Concord, NC 28026

The service area population is approximately 80,000, and the Traffic Management Center will serve interstate and intrastate traffic utilizing I-85, US-29, US-601, NCDOT primary highways passing through the area on a daily basis, and major tourist destinations such as Concord Mills Mall and the Charlotte Motor Speedway. Concord Mills is the number one tourist attraction in the State of North Carolina. In 2005, 17.5 million people visited the facility. Additionally, Charlotte Motor Speedway hosts 1 million visitors each year.

$600,000

Scotland County
Post Office Box 489
Laurinburg, NC 28353

The potential complex would become a tremendous driver for employment in the future. Due to the loss of textile companies from the southeastern region of North Carolina in the past decade, many counties such as Scotland have worked diligently to compensate for the loss of these jobs. All avenues of job creation are explored and pursued to create opportunities for employment for the residents Scotland County. Scotland County has been greatly impacted due to trade. Funding is greatly needed to reverse the trend of job loss during the past decade.

$2 million

Montgomery County
102 East Spring Street
Troy, NC 27371

The County is seeking funding to construct a Parking Apron, construct a Parallel Taxiway to Runway and extend and widen the Runway in order to encourage economic development.

$2.5 million

Blue Springs Hoke County CDC (BSHC-CDC)
102 East Elwood Avenue
Raeford, NC 28376

One aim of the EP-CBAH Initiative, which is conceived as a rural model capable of replication elsewhere, is to preserve open space such as forests, streams, and wetlands, while achieving affordability for working families. The 21-acre track under option for this project includes a tributary of Rockfish Creek, and is located adjacent to the Hoke Community Forest and about two miles from Fort Bragg. By clustering homes and preserving large swaths of open space on the site, the overall cost of development is reduced. Significantly, another feature of this site is its proximity and access to a community forest. Aware of both NYC's emerging Active Design Guidelines, and the 2009 HUD-DOT-EPA Sustainable Communities guidelines, BSHC-CDC expects to promote health and mobility in its design strategies by exploring concepts such as access to full service grocery facilities, fresh produce, and the enhanced park and recreational opportunities inherent in the Hoke Community Forest feature. Desirable amenities such as pedestrian walking and biking paths on the site and the nearby Community Forest are likely to be prioritized. Another goal of the project is to promote efficiency and conservation in transportation and building practices. Coupled with some of the transportation options already outlined, BSHCCDC, working with its technical assistance provider, the NC Association of Community Development Corporations (NCACDC), will use a collaborative, green design process during 2010 that respects the interrelationships between a building's systems and prioritizes the reduction of construction and operating costs as well as environmental impacts. Ideally, this project could evolve into a nature-based, conservation teaching site for local public school students expanding their knowledge of strategies that respectfully use natural resources to address human needs. Along with pursuit of the above mentioned objectives, BCHC-CDC, together with NCACDC, will also investigate opportunities to link small business development opportunities as well as certified entry level green retro-fit and construction apprenticeship and training opportunities for unemployed youth and dislocated workers with implementation of these sustainable, green building practices.

Energy and Water

$2,000,000

North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center
4021 Carya Drive
Raleigh, NC 27610

The aging of America's water and sewer infrastructure is a well documented and much talked about crisis. The American Society of Civil Engineers reports that the nation is losing 7 billion gallons of water each day through leaky pipes. In North Carolina alone, water systems statewide are losing 11% of treated water annually due to leaks. The N.C. Rural Center's Water 2030 Initiative was the most comprehensive water resources study ever conducted in North Carolina. Hundreds of small rural communities across North Carolina do not have the tax base to pay for expensive new water supply and wastewater improvements. Rather than relying solely on the construction of new systems, this Rural Center program is necessary to help rural and economically distressed communities manage physician infrastructure and identify ways to rehabilitate and increase the capacity of existing systems, eliminate water loss resulting in revenue loss, and reduce the amount of wastewater being treated due to infiltration thereby reducing expenses. Funding will be used to assist publicly owned small town water utilities generate additional water and wastewater capacity through system efficiency improvements such as leak detection, inflow and infiltration detection, and line repair, rather than the construction of more costly new facilities.

$1,000,000

North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center
4021 Carya Drive
Raleigh, NC 27610

With federal support, the Rural Center will expand its successful Building Reuse and Restoration Program by implementing the Energy Efficiency Retrofit Initiative. This new program will provide matching grants to municipalities, who will then loan the money to businesses to retrofit existing manufacturing facilities in rural North Carolina with energy efficiency improvements. By leveraging the Rural Center's existing program, the requested funds will create approximately 150 new jobs in hard-hit rural North Carolina. Additionally, according to established Department of Energy metrics, this program will save more than 6.5 megawatt hours of electricity annually, preventing the release of almost 6,000 metric tons of greenhouse gases.

$1,170,000

Montgomery County Government
102 East Spring Street
Troy, NC 27371

The purpose of this request is to replace worn out HVAC systems and roofs in need of repair to reduce cost, reduce consumption of energy and improve the environment.

$2,000,000

Laurinburg Institute
125 McGirts Bridge Rd.
Laurinburg, NC 28353

Rehabilitating the campus will create a number of jobs for the county, city and state. In addition, its successful completion will be contributing to the overall preservation of our planet. Finally, students need an environment that does not teach about setting an example for our planet but actually leads by example.

$2,000,000

City of Kannapolis
PO Box 1199
Kannapolis, NC 28082

The City of Kannapolis has entered into a public-private partnership agreement with a development group for the construction of a new Business Park west of the city limits. It is anticipated that the project's 15-year build-out will reach close to $120.0 million in tax value and create more than 500 new jobs. The city is committed to designing and constructing a 2650-foot water extension from the existing line, as well as an elevated water tank and a booster pump station.

$750,000

gDwell, Inc.
7300 E Lakeside Dr.
Charlotte, NC 28215

gDwell is a NC non-profit established with architects, scientists and technicians from UNC-C and CPCC; it originated in a pilot project born under the non-profit Center for Sustainability in Charlotte. gDwell recycles materials and uses off the shelf technology to create buildings that are off-grid and extremely affordable. This funding will create a manufacturing center in Charlotte that generates jobs and enables gDwell to manufacture housing components for projects locally and globally. It will also directly support these projects by purchasing required materials (which will directly fuel work at the facility) and helping to leverage additional funding.
 

$800,000

Central Piedmont Community College
PO Box 35009
Charlotte, NC 28235

Funding is being requested establish this comprehensive training center that will train students for high demand careers in conventional (nuclear, coal) and alternative (solar, wind, biofuels) energy production, green building and smart grid technology.

Making the nations power grid “smarter’ through computer automation will bring great opportunity for efficiency and regulation, it also brings some challenges. The security of the smart grid is paramount and its protection has become a matter of national security. Information Technology specialist trained in both digital security and forensics will be needed to ensure national security.

$2,500,000

Charlotte Mecklenburg Utilities
5100 Brookshire Boulevard
Charlotte, NC 28216

The Charlotte, North Carolina, metropolitan area is among the top 10 fastest growing metropolitan areas in the nation, and has seen an almost 50 percent growth in population since 1980 according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The 2004 Census estimates there are 801,137 people living in Mecklenburg County with 614,330 of those living in Charlotte. The county's population is projected to reach 1 million people in 2010; roughly 78% of that population will be in Charlotte.

The Briar Creek Relief Sewer project is critical to continued in-fill development with the Charlotte urban district. Based on current modeling and flow measurements in the existing Briar Creek sewer system, insufficient capacity exists to support continued growth and to be able to handle wet weather flows in a manner that meets the Clean Water Act and is acceptable to US EPA. Without the project the City will likely be subject to enforcement actions by EPA for sewer overflows during large storm events and moratoriums on wastewater connections in the future. The City may not be able to fulfill its goal of having more high density in-fill development, perpetuating urban sprawl into currently undeveloped areas.

$1,000,000

Mecklenburg County
600 East 4th Street
Charlotte, NC 28202

County projects targeted for energy enhancement are registered with the U.S. Green Building Council for LEED certification. Use of solar technology, for example, will save an estimated $240,000 a year in energy cost and simultaneously reduce operational expenses. The fuel is 100% renewable and non-polluting.  Preliminary reviews indicate that the jail will likely be able to use 95-100% of the hot water produced by the solar thermal technologies because the jail's 24/7/365 operations provide the ability to take full advantage of the energy produced by the sun, and the jail has considerable hot water needs for the kitchen, laundry, showers and toilets. This project would create jobs in production facilities, and for construction employees on the job site to complete installation.

$1,500,000

Mecklenburg County (Solid Waste Division)
600 East 4th Street
Charlotte, NC 28202

Funding this project would enable the recycling of over 90,000 tons per year of yard waste instead of disposing in landfills and converts these materials into compost and mulch landscaping products and biomass fuel, used primarily in the local pulp and paper industry as a replacement for petroleum based fuels. This is much more cost effective and environmentally favorable to air quality, which Mecklenburg County is a non-attainment area. Additionally, this project significantly improves the County's ability to handle debris resulting from severe weather conditions such as hurricanes and ice storms.

$2,500,000

City of Kannapolis
PO Box 1199
Kannapolis, NC 28082

As a growing community with a long-standing commitment to economic development, the City of Kannapolis is working to create opportunities for economic expansion in the northeastern section of Kannapolis and, as a future growth area, the adjacent parts of Cabarrus County. An essential piece supporting future development in those areas is the construction of a one million gallon elevated water storage tank on Leroy Street near the intersection of Highway 3 and Little Texas Road. The tank will vastly improve the distribution and fire flow capabilities in the eastern portion of Kannapolis, provide water service to a 200-acre tract of industrial land adjacent to I-85 and provide the needed infrastructure to respond to new development in the northeastern portion of Cabarrus County.

Homeland Security

$1,687,500

Montgomery County, North Carolina
102 East Spring Street
Troy, NC  27371

The purpose of this request is to secure funding to purchase and outfit three fire trucks to replace the oldest fire trucks in three of our ten volunteer fire departments.  The new fire trucks will replace trucks that are over twelve years old.  Additionally, the funding will be used to purchase adequate Personnel Protective Equipment for all of our Emergency Service Providers.  The equipment will help protect the Emergency Service Providers as they serve the public to the best of their ability.

$900,000

City of Kannapolis
246 Oak Avenue
Kannapolis, NC  28081-4329

The 8th Street culvert connector road is used by a number of citizens as a primary transportation route.  As a result of Tropical Storm Fay, large cracks in the wall and floor of the culvert have limited structural support for the roadway above and necessitated the roadway’s closure since December 2008.  The purpose of the request is to replace this culvert and reopen a significant east-west transportation corridor in Kannapolis.

$350,000

Scotland County, North Carolina
1405 West Boulevard
Laurinburg, NC  28352

A new Emergency Operations Center (EOC) will improve public safety, especially in times of major emergencies when it is most needed. Having a functional, well operated EOC is integral to the stable functioning of Scotland County during disasters. Having a dysfunctional EOC is tantamount to ensuring disaster.
This project will relocate the Scotland County Emergency Operations Center from its current location in a flood plain and adjacent to railroad. This self-contained EOC can sustain operations with essential EOC personnel onsite for 72 hours without an external power source in response to any incident.  The EOC will operate a unified command structure with appropriate communication infrastructure.  The center will also be used for training, a location for the distribution of public information, and for governmental meetings and activities.

$187,500

City of Concord
26 S. Union St
Concord, NC  28025

This project will ensure adequate water supply in the event of a fire emergency and is a good use of taxpayer dollars.  Based on past experiences, the City knows that there are areas where the water pressure is inadequate to address a fire emergency – whether it be residential, commercial or industrial.  It is imperative to identify these areas and rectify the problem before a disaster occurs.

$1,000,000

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department
601 East Trade Street
Charlotte, NC  28202

Currently, the communications centers for the City of Charlotte's public safety agencies are spread throughout the City and provide some duplicative services.  In addition, these centers are not interconnected which prohibits the City from dispatching first responders in a fully coordinated fashion.
The City of Charlotte is exploring the co-location of the communications centers for public safety agencies to include Police, Fire, Emergency Medical Services, and possibly the City's 311 Call Center.  One option that the City is considering is locating the center in an area where the City is undertaking a major revitalization effort.  Co-location of these functions would allow for better efficiency, both operationally and financially, by reducing overlapping and redundant functions as well as streamlining operations.  Furthermore, moving the Police Communications Division from the Police Headquarters building will free up much needed space and power within that building, enabling it to remain functional in additional capacities for a much longer period of time.

Education, Labor, HHS

$2,000,000

David H. Murdock Research Institute
150 Research Campus Drive
Kannapolis, NC 28081

Full funding of this project would create 10-12 scientific jobs and supporting costs per year over a two year period at the North Carolina Research Campus, where the Core Lab research facilities provide scientists access to the most advanced research equipment in the world, speeding important scientific discoveries in a fraction of the time required at other facilities. To ensure ongoing scientific merit and good stewardship of the funding, the Steering Committee to approve proposals and monitor progress would include 3 scientists and leaders at the National MS Society, 1-2 consumers, 1 MS clinician and the President of David H. Murdock Research Institute.

$1,000,000

North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center
4021 Carya Drive
Raleigh, NC 27610

Funding will allow 11 local projects covering 15 counties to operate through 2010 calendar year.  FY 2011 federal funding would allow the project to expand to 12 additional communities for 18 months.  The project provides grants, training and technical assistance to local organizations to serve the dislocated workers. The current project will serve more than 1,100 unemployed and underemployed individuals and help place 300 project participants in jobs.  Program expansion will result in job placements for 800. 

$150,000

Anson County
320 Camden Road
Wadesboro, NC 28170

The Safe/Orderly Schools project at Anson High and Anson Middle is designed to completely and comprehensively replace communication and security infrastructure not permissive under current Fiscal or State funding sources. The surveillance and security infrastructure currently does not provide adequate coverage internally and externally of both schools presenting serious “blind” spots for school administration and law enforcement during curricular and co- curricular activities as well as community events.

$750,000

Laurinburg Institute
125 McGirts Bridge Rd.
Laurinburg, NC 28353

Funding would create a job training program for an onsite internship.  The students would travel to the city or designated cities with a facilitator to intern and gain real life experience.  The companies will have working relationships with the Institute in preparation for the student or students’ arrival and the student will have reporting obligations to satisfy the program.
 

$750,000

Laurinburg Institute
125 McGirts Bridge Rd.
Laurinburg, NC 28353

Laurinburg Institute has a rich history of educating less fortunate children, this program would significantly increase the Institute’s ability to educate more children and the communities from where the children originate. 

$1,000,000

Laurinburg Institute
125 McGirts Bridge Rd.
Laurinburg, NC 28353

This project will employ people from the community and allow for the increase enrollment of students to the Institute and expand upon the Institute’s relationship with the community. Funds will be used to upgrade the administration’s operations, review and examine operation and update weaknesses to the standards of comparable institutions, and examine and update weaknesses in academic curriculum. 
 

$900,000

Methodist University
5400 Ramsey Street
Fayetteville, NC 28311

There is a need to train professionals to prevent and to respond to major threats to public safety.  As the threats continue to grow in complexity and difficulty, the emergency response also grows in complexity and difficulty.  Multiple public and private agencies are called to respond.  Chemical and biological threats to public safety are growing and the sources are diverse, from chemical plant explosions to train derailments to methamphetamine houses.  In the field, there is a need to be able to positively identify the threat involved and to ensure the safety of the responders and the general public.  Funding would be used for Vulnerability Assessment and Incident Response Training curriculum development and purchase of specialized equipment to train professionals to more effectively identify and respond to all hazards and to ensure public safety.
 

$2,000,000

Richmond County Community College
1042 West Hamlet Avenue
Hamlet, NC 28345

The purpose of this project is to address the high poverty and unemployment rates in Richmond and Scotland counties by developing a globally competitive trained and ready 21st century workforce. As the only public postsecondary institution located in the two counties, Richmond Community College’s capability to train and educate such a workforce is the key to economic development. Expanding and enhancing the College’s industrial training facility to accommodate state-of-the-art STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) related programs is the critical element requiring resources beyond local means blocking workforce development.

$595,000

Friends of the Montgomery County Library System
254 Tower Rd
Troy, NC 27371

The Montgomery County Library is moving into a new building, and this funding would be used to purchase new book collections, both electronic and hard cover, new library furniture, and upgrade the computer systems. This funding benefits a public library open to all area residents.

$1,000,000

Laurinburg Institute
125 McGirts Bridge Rd.
Laurinburg, NC 28353

Laurinburg Institute has a rich history of educating less fortunate children. This program would increase the Institute’s ability to educate more children in the field of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

$520,000

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jackson Hall, CB# 2200
Chapel Hill, NC 27599

Funding will be used as direct support for recent college graduates to serve as advisers in communities throughout North Carolina.  The goal will be to encourage and leverage support from current and potential benefactors locally and nationally.  The program will provide $1 for every $1 in private support secured from such donors until all matching funds are expended. This funding will help low-income, first-generation, and underrepresented high school students navigate the college admissions and financial aid processes.

$750,000

Methodist University
5400 Ramsey Street
Fayetteville, NC 28311

There is a critical need for additional health care providers in the State of North Carolina. National projections indicate a shortage of about 450,000 RNs by 2012 and the North Carolina State Board of Nursing predicts a state shortage of nurses in excess of 32,000 by the year 2020. Methodist University anticipates measurable improvements in health care, education and rural economies as a direct and indirect result of further growth in the nursing program to include a decrease in mortality rates among rural and underserved populations in southeastern North Carolina; a regional population more educated in hygiene, disease prevention, pre-natal care, and nutrition; an increase in primary care clinicians in rural NC and general disaster pre-preparedness with stronger local communities that can contribute to an improved state economy.

$500,000

Scotland County
Post Office Box 489
Laurinburg, NC 28353

In a County with a population of 37,000, Scotland County's Senior Wellness Center serves 5,000 annually. The Center requires expansion and upgrades to be a modern, well-equipped facility suitable to care for the County's aging population.
This project will improve the general health and quality of life for the County's senior population. This is a valuable use of taxpayer funds because improvements in the health of a population reduce the costs of governmental intervention needed through health and entitlement programs. Additionally, the Senior Wellness Center, when completed, will constitute the infrastructure needed to develop a senior-friendly community in Scotland County. Establishing a reputation for taking care of the senior population is very much an economic development issue for the County.

$500,000

Central Piedmont Community College
PO Box 35009
Charlotte, NC 28235

The Bureau of Labor Statistics has forecast that through 2012, employment in science and engineering occupations will grow about 70 percent faster than employment in other occupations; by 2014, employers expect to hire 2.5 million new STEM workers. CPCC will work with the eight community college members of the Charlotte Regional Workforce Development Partnership, workforce development boards, and regional K-12 systems and four-year colleges and universities including Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte to increase the academic success of students interested in career paths in health, energy, and IT.

$500,000
 
Ft. Bragg Region NC STEM Community Collaborative
3021 Cornwallis Road
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709

There is an urgent and critical need to provide the 11-county Fort Bragg region students with STEM curriculum and individualized learning opportunities focused on the defense, homeland security, health, and aerospace industry sectors.  Students need to understand the relevancy of their learning and teachers need partnerships with military, government, non-profit organizations, and the private sector to leverage current and future technology applications to increase students’ STEM skills.  The Fort Bragg Region NC Stem Community Collaborative will use federal funding to engage students in interactive learning environments and provide teachers with state of the art resources to leverage new Enhanced Technology Classrooms across the region. 
 

$465,000

County of Mecklenburg
600 E. 4th Street, 11th Floor
Charlotte, NC 28202

The Area Mental Health, Substance Abuse and Developmental Disability Services Awareness Campaign will improve mental health and substance abuse healthcare system in Mecklenburg County and the surrounding region.  These benefits include an increased  mental health and substance abuse awareness community wide, an increased number of individuals served by the public mental health and substance abuse system, a reduced stigma surrounding the need for mental health and substance abuse services, reduced stigma around family member survivors of suicide, an increased number of underserved individuals receiving services to include those in jail, Latinos, Asians and others who do not typically seek services, and reduced jail recidivism by linking jail inmates with appropriate services and peer support prior to leaving the jail.

$1,000,000

Central Piedmont Community College
PO Box 35009
Charlotte, NC 28235

According to the US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, job projections for medical records and health information technicians is robust; the projected need for these types of employees is 76,000 for the decade 2006-2016. The Bureau projects a growth rate of 18-26% for these occupations, as well as for medical equipment repair technicians who are critical to the integration of healthcare and information technology. In response to the need for hands-on training, CPCC will lead a regional effort to establish an advanced training facility equipped with highly sophisticated patient simulators and advanced health IT and biomedical equipment. This equipment would improve training for nursing and allied health care workers and build a new program in health, Information technology (Health IT) and biomedical equipment technology.

$2,000,000

County of Montgomery
102 East Spring Street
Troy, NC 27371

The purpose of this request is to construct a new Health Science building. Montgomery County Community College cannot accommodate the demand for health care professionals, nor accommodate the unemployed who see retaining in this job field.

$535,000

County of Cumberland
117 Dick Street, Room 512
Fayetteville, NC 28301

EMR for Cumberland County Public Health Department will improve health care for patients in addition to helping providers to be more efficient with their resources and more effective with their reporting.  Additionally it allows for the ease of transmission from one location to another so records are not lost.  The CMS will provide a more orderly environment for the citizens attending public health clinics and valuable information for time study analysis that can benefit the patient, the operation and the taxpayers.  The digitization of records for veterans will also ease the transmission of files from one location to another as veterans travel for necessary services and prevent the loss of important records for those serving in the military.

$500,000

Presbyterian Hospital
200 Hawthorne Lane
Charlotte, NC 28204
 
The Presbyterian Hospital Community Care Cruiser program seeks federal funding to expand its successful Community Care Cruiser program to serve additional areas of Mecklenburg County, Cabarrus and Union Counties.  The current cruiser, operating since 2007, has served 3200 children and is designed to combat healthcare disparities among underserved children across the region and provide primary and preventive pediatric medical care.  Medical services provided on the cruiser will increase the number of children with health insurance, improve immunization rates, remove health disparities among the disadvantaged, promote access to preventive health services, foster positive, supportive living and working conditions in our communities, and support families in the effort to develop the capabilities, education and skills to achieve a healthy lifestyle.

$178,000 

Montgomery County Schools
441 Page Street, PO Box 427
Troy, NC 27371

Montgomery County Schools is responsible for preparing all students for the 21st century. The community has lost valuable employment. Opportunities are limited and financial support within the community is limited. The students we prepare today will be responsible for the economic well being of tomorrow. The decision to remain in Montgomery County or relocate elsewhere requires a new skills set. These students are our future. Much of their legacy will be to make our local, state, and national government stronger. This initiative will prepare the future taxpayers.
Through education and exposure the students' will repay this initiative through their tax dollars at work.

$535,000

Hoke County Schools
310 Wooley Street
Raeford, NC 28376

Through this project, Hoke County Schools plans to purchase SmartBoards and supporting equipment to place in classrooms to provide interactive learning experiences for students, as Hoke County Schools seeks to provide students with access to 21st century technology systems to prepare them to be productive citizens of our society. Hoke County Schools will be targeting all elementary schools so that every classroom has a SmartBoard placed in it. Currently, Hoke County Schools have placed SmartBoard technology in approximately 65% of all classrooms in the district.

$520,000

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jackson Hall, CB# 2200
Chapel Hill, NC 27599

Funding will be used as direct support for recent college graduates to serve as advisers in communities throughout North Carolina. The goal will be to encourage and leverage support from current and potential benefactors locally and nationally. The program will provide $1 for every $1 in private support secured from such donors until all matching funds are expended. This funding will help low-income, first-generation, and underrepresented high school students navigate the college admissions and financial aid processes.

$2,000,000

Montgomery County Health and Human Services
102 East Spring Street
Troy, NC 27371

Montgomery County has a one of the highest unemployment rates in the state of North Carolina. Those that are unemployed or have low incomes are the largest clients that are Department of Social Services and Health Department provide services to. The County is striving to provide a safe and effective working environment for both the clients of the County and staff whom serve the clients.

$50,000,000

Teach for America
315 West 36th Street
New York, NY 10018

This funding would be used to recruit, select, train, and provide professional development to top recent college graduates of all academic majors who commit two years to teach in our nation’s highest poverty communities in 38 regions across the country.

$35,000,000

Center for Civic Education
5145 Douglas Fir Road
Calabasas, CA  91302

The Education for Democracy Act programs are among the most cost effective programs supported by the federal government. They effectively promote among students a profound understanding of and commitment to the fundamental values and principles of American constitutional democracy as expressed in such seminal documents as the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and Bill of Rights, and the Gettysburg Address. They also promote students' capacities to participate competently and responsibility in the political life of their communities and the nation. Civic education/democracy will be critical with globalization of the economy. Students will need to not only understand the American system but international democracies as well.

Subcommittee: Labor, HHS, Education
Agency: Department of Education
Account:  Special Education
Program:  IDEA – Grants to Preschools
Description:  We request a significant increase over the FY10 level listed below for the IDEA preschool program to provide early interventions to enhance development, assist families in meeting their children’s needs, and reduce long-term costs by minimizing the need for special education and maximizing independent living.
Request Amount:  $374,099,000

Subcommittee: Labor, HHS, Education
Agency: Department of Education
Account:  Special Education
Program:  IDEA – Grants to Infants and Families
Description:  We request a significant increase over the FY10 level listed below for grants to infants and families to provide early intervention to enhance development, assist families in meeting their children’s needs, and reduce long-term costs by minimizing the need for special education and maximizing independent living.
Request Amount:  $439,427,000

Subcommittee: Labor, HHS, Education
Agency: Department of Education
Account:  Special Education
Program:  IDEA – National Activities
Description:  We request a significant increase over the FY10 level listed below for IDEA national activities to provide critical support to improve special education, including professional development to ensure that teachers and personnel are knowledgeable about best practices and qualified to meet the needs of students with disabilities.
Request Amount:  $260,203,000

Subcommittee: Labor, HHS
Agency: Department of Education
Account: Impact Aid 
Program: Impact Aid
Description: The Impact Aid Program was created in 1950 to assist local school districts that lost property tax revenue due to the presence of tax-exempt federal property, or that have experienced increased expenditures due to the enrollment of federally-connected children, including Native American and military dependent children. 
Request Amount: $1,385,000,000 total which reflects funding for Section 8002 (104,200,000), Section 8003 ($1,188,000,000), Section 8003(d) ($50,000,000), Section 8007 ($37,000,000) and Section 8008 ($5,000,000)

Subcommittee:
Labor HHS Education
Agency: Department of Health & Human Services
Account: NIH – Office of the Director
Program: General National Institutes of Health Funding
President Obama’s FY2011 Request: $32,247,200,000
Budget for FY2010: $31,247,200,000
Description:
The National Institutes of Health is our nation’s preeminent medical research institution and represents our best hope for finding cures and treatments for the devastating diseases and conditions that affect millions of Americans. NIH research is essential to containing soaring medical costs, reforming health care, strengthening our economy, inspiring the next generation of scientists and researchers, and maintaining our nation’s leadership in innovation. The recent boost in NIH funding in FY2009 and FY2010 was an important step toward regaining the lost potential of the last several years and rebuilding our economy. For these reasons, I am seeking an increase for NIH of at least 7 percent over the FY 2010 baseline.
Request Amount: $33,434,504,000

Financial Services

$750,000

North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center
4021 Carya Drive
Raleigh, NC 27610

With federal support, the NC Rural Center will increase its outreach into rural communities by utilizing the Homegrown Jobs Center.  The Center will seek to aggressively engage rural economically distressed communities through a series of outreach meetings designed to inform rural leaders about funding resources, provide technical assistance, conduct a thorough analysis of the economic drivers on a regional and sub-regional basis that are likely to yield the most jobs in the coming years, and instill this research-based information within local rural leaders to assist them in community revitalization, job creation, local and regional economic development and the process of strategically rebuilding their local economies. 

$800,000

City of Fayetteville
433 Hay St
Fayetteville, NC 28301

Defense, intelligence and homeland security agencies need consolidated classroom, airborne/ground and integration training capabilities and Fayetteville, NC is central to federal agencies on the east coast.  Secure facilities are scarce and multiple units must be responsive-able in order to share current tactics, techniques, procedures, and lessons learned.  The enemy is dynamic and changes at a rapid pace.  Organizations must be able to train, kit out and test systems in same facilities, enabling classified operational testing and evaluation to be completed in a fluid environment.  This training is already being conducted at the Fayetteville Regional Airport at the Secret level.  The SCIF is required so units can conduct training at the Top Secret Special Compartmented levels.   

Newsletter Sign Up

Get Congressman Kissell's email newsletter with news affecting the 8th District.

Subscribe

Follow Larry

Bill Search


scroll

Bill Number:
(Ex: "H.R. 1")
Word/Phrase:
(Ex: "Agriculture")

Latest News

This Week in Washington
I think the people of America have been very clear. You want folks in Washington to work together to get...…
Rep. Kissell Votes to Avert Government Shutdown
WASHINGTON, DC – Today, Representative Larry Kissell (NC-08) voted in support of H.R. 2608, to provide a short-term extension to...…
This Week in Washington
The coming of fall marks a very busy time for farmers and ranchers. All across the Eighth District and the...…